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What Propagation Tray Do You Need?

Containerwise 40L Beetroot
Home | Blog 2021 | What Propagation Tray Do You Need?

March 26, 2021

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Home | Blog 2021 | What Propagation Tray Do You Need?

With so many kinds of propagation trays it gets hard to understand what will work best for you. We are not only talking about module trays or seed trays but also soil block makers and nursery pots. I made a blog post about my journey to finding the containerwise trays. If you want to learn more about why the Containerwise Trays are my personal favortite trays you can read that blog post.

My Search For The Best Propagation Tray

Containerwise Propagation trays

Containerwise Module trays

What Containerwise Tray should you get?

Let’s chat about why we use Module trays and which tray you need for what plant. Currently on offer are 7 different varieties of the trays. They all have their own usage and pros and cons.

My personal favourite is the 40 cell shallow module tray. It’s perfect for starting out almost all seeds besides the deep rooted vegetables like peas and artichokes. I use the 40L for starting beetroot, onions, radishes, cabbages, tomatoes and brassicas.

But some plant need more time in the tray or just have such a quickly growing root system they rather have a deep tray. Let’s list all the trays on offer with their pros, cons and specs.

Module tray 15 cell

The 15 Cell shallow tray

Cell Size

69mm x 69mm x 90mm

Best Application

Tomatoes, Eggplant, Artichoke, Peppers

Plants per m²

204

Drainage Hole

24mm

PROS

  • Big cell size
  • Room for plant foliage
  • Can hold plants for a long time

CONS

  • Few plants per m²
  • Need much compost

Module tray 28 cell bottom

The 28 Cell shallow tray

Cell Size

49mm x 49mm x 65mm

Best Application

Brassicas, Corn, Zucchini, Pumpkins, Winter Squash, Cucumbers

Plants per m²

372

Drainage Hole

22mm

PROS

  • Big cell size
  • Can hold plants for a long time
  • Good drainage

CONS

  • Few plants per m²

 

40 Cell Module Tray

The 40 Cell shallow tray

Cell Size

42mm x 42mm x 55mm

Best Application

Beetroot, Onion, Radish

Plants per m²

531

Drainage Hole

20mm

PROS

  • Average cell size
  • Many plants per m²
  • Good drainage

CONS

  • Not for deep rooting plants

Containerwise 77L Module tray bottom

The 77 Cell shallow tray

Cell Size

30mm x 30mm x 50mm

Best Application

Spinach, Lettuce, Herbs

Plants per m²

1023

Drainage Hole

18mm

PROS

  • Many plants per m²
  • Good drainage
  • Great for small sprouting plants

CONS

  • Not for deep rooting plants
  • Small cell size

Charles Dowding CD60 Module Tray top

The 60 Cell Charles Dowding shallow tray

Cell Size

29.5mm x 29.5mm x 44mm

Best Application

Spinach, Lettuce, Herbs

Plants per m²

815

Drainage Hole

14mm

PROS

  • Many plants per m²
  • Good drainage

CONS

  • Not for deep rooting plants
  • Small cell size

 

Module Tray 28 cell bottom

The 28 Cell Deep tray

Cell Size

49mm x 49mm x 120mm

Best Application

Peas, zucchini, Pumpkins and trees like Oaks and walnuts.

Plants per m²

372

Drainage Hole

22mm

PROS

  • Many plants per m²
  • Space for root growth
  • Extreem deep

CONS

  • Needs loads loads loads of compost

High Module Tray 40 cell

The 40 Cell Deep tray

Cell Size

42mm x 42mm x 85mm

Best Application

Peas, Artichoke, Eggplants, Pumpkins and Beans

Plants per m²

531

Drainage Hole

20mm

PROS

  • Many plants per m²
  • Space for root growth
  • Extra deep

CONS

  • Needs loads of compost

Conclusion

Overall I’m a big fan of the Containerwise trays because of their strong hold, ease of use and good water drainage.

My personal favorite is the 40 cell shallow trays because of its for me perfect size to start out my vegetables and the ease of pushing out the cell because of the big drainage holes.

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7 Comments

  1. Hi, Will you be getting the 15 and 28-cell trays back in? I’d definitely buy some! Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi Susan! They are now in stock ?

      Reply
  2. I was wondering whether all the module trays you sell fit into the propagator. It says they are compatible with the lower module trays, but which ones are considered low?

    Reply
    • Hi Jordi,
      Great question! The best fit is the Charles Dowding 60 cell. But the 40 and 77 cells also fit nicely.
      Deep trays usually have the name DEEP in the title.
      hope this helps!

      Reply
      • Hey, thanks for your reply. 🙂 I guess I’ll go for the CD60 and the shallow 40 then. I guess the lid of the propagator just doesn’t close nicely if you use the deep 40 cells in the propagator, right? How bad does it fit? Cause I would really like to have a deep one for broadbeans. You are very welcome to send me a picture through email of the deep 40 cells in the propagator, so I can decide whether it’s acceptable for me.

        Reply
  3. What size tray would you recommend for taking cuttings (stekjes) from all kinds of plants (Lavender and other woody herbs or shrubs)? At the moment I use old 2×2 cm 4 cm high polyurethene (piepschuim) trays but I find them to small for good rootsystems to form before they need to be transplanted. I would like a good compromise between space and volume. And keep them in there until they are good size plants (5 cm wide, 5-10 cm high, with matching rootsystems).

    Reply
    • Hi Eveline, Good question! Nicole and I had a chat about it and we think the best fit would be either a 40 cell shallow or deep. Depending on what plants you want to grow more of.
      Some like to go further down than others. That way you can grow a lot in a small space but still have enough room for roots and foliage.

      Hope this helps!

      Reply

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